Earlier this week, Donald Trump's White House doctor revealed the results of the president's recent physical exam. With many questioning the results [VIDEO], one host on MSNBC dug a little deeper into the mind of the commander in chief.

MSNBC on Trump

For the better part of the last two and a half years, Donald Trump has dominated the political headlines [VIDEO] and captivated the entire country, whether it was for good or bad. Starting during the early days of his campaign, Trump made the idea of physical appearance and intelligence a center piece of his agenda. Whether it was poking fun at Ron Paul's hair or Carly Fiorina's face, to admitting one a debate stage that he once referred to actress Rosie O'Donnell as "fat" and a "pig," the former host of "The Apprentice" has put a heavy focus on outer appearance.

In addition, the president has made a habit of gloating about his alleged intelligence, often claiming that he's the smartest person in the room. Once Dr. Ronny Jackson revealed the results of his cognitive exam, scoring a perfect 30/30, Trump once again decided to brag. These issues and more were highlighted during the January 18 edition of "Deadline: White House" on MSNBC.

(Wallace's remarks come at 0:20 in the above video.)

Joined by panel guest Eli Stokols of the Wall Street Journal, host Nicolle Wallace discussed whether or not Chief of Staff John Kelly spent so much time in the White House as a way to keep Donald Trump under wraps. Wallace cited a recent remark from Sen. Lindsey Graham by saying that Trump has a tendency to be influenced by people who feed into his ego by saying he's "smart" or "handsome."

Nicolle Wallace doubled down, comparing Donald Trump's behavior to a "childlike capacity" in how he picks and chooses who he will remain loyal to based on the level of compliments he receives.

Wallace also chimed in on John Kelly's recent remarks about the president not being well-informed when it come to his immigration policy, warning that there was "trouble on the first floor of the West Wing" over "tensions being at a high water mark for the president and his second chief of staff"

Moving forward

Whether it's infighting with members of his administration or dealing with backlash from the media, Donald Trump can't seem to find a healthy balance of support outside his core base. While the president's base has remained loyal, his favorability rating continues to remain at less than 35 percent and is showing no signs of improving as the country inches closer to the midterm elections.