It was just last week when Donald Trump and the entire Republican Party were left embarrassed after failing to unite on a Health Care Reform bill. The topic of health care was discussed during the "Overtime" segment following the latest "Real Time with Bill Maher" on HBO.

Real Time on health care

Ever since former President Barack Obama signed off on the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, back in January 2010, Republicans have made it their mission to repeal the law in question. While Obamacare seemed safe after it was upheld by the Supreme Court back in 2012, the fear of its demise increased after Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election and walked into the White House with a Repubican majority in both the House of Representatives and the Senate.

When Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan came together earlier this month to promote their health care alternative, it seemed as if the GOP dream of Obamacare repeal was finally going to happen, but it all came crashing down when the right-wing House Freedom Caucus refused to support the bill. These issues were highlighted during the "Overtime" segment with Bill Maher on March 31.

(The Obamacare exchange starts at 9:00 in the above video.)

Following Friday's episode of "Real Time with Bill Maher," the YouTube-exclusive "Overtime" segment took place where panel guest Neera Tanden, the president of the Center for American Progress, and host Bill Maher, clashed with former Sen. Republican Rick Santorum. After Tanden called out the GOP for failing to unify behind a health care replace, Tanden debunked popular Republican talking points about the alleged failure of Obamacare.

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Rick Santorum chimed in, attempting to blast Obamacare for using government money to help cover low-income Americans, but ran into a brick wall of fact-checking and push back from Bill Maher and Neera Tanden. "Even Kansas voted for the Medicaid expansion...that's not a liberal state!," Maher said. When Santorum complained that it was "free money from the federal government," Maher fired back, commenting, "to take care of poor people!" "So the people who get bladder cancer in a state that experiments badly, they just die?" Maher wondered. The segment closed with the former Pennsylvania senator arguing that health insurance should be about freedom, regardless if the federal government could help cover those who are uninsured.