In a surprising development, Capcom announced that 'Resident Evil 7' is coming to the Nintendo Switch this week, though with are a couple of catches. The port called 'Resident Evil 7: Cloud Version' will be released exclusively on the Japanese eShop through the cloud.

Exclusive via the cloud?

Capcom has stated that their plans to distribute the latest installment in the survival horror game franchise will be handled strictly through cloud streaming as opposed to digital and retail copies. Although players will be able to experience the game on Nintendo's mobile console whether it docked and undocked, Capcom warns that a stable a stable internet connection is required to do so.

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Capcom stated that save files for 'Resident Evil 7: Cloud Version' will be handled on the cloud as opposed to the console. However, the company warned that any save files linked to inactive accounts might become subject to deletion.

Stream RE7 to its entirety

The cloud version will be a complete collection much like the Gold Edition, meaning it will include the main game and all four DLC packs already released on console and PC. Capcom plans to allow players to experience the first 15 minutes of the game as part of a free trial.

However, if they want to get the full experience, they must buy into a 180-day service pass to do so.

The game is currently priced is currently at ¥2,000 ($18.01). Currently, there is no word on releases for other territories. However, an announcement could be made by Capcom during the upcoming E3 2018 event.

But why the cloud?

It is currently unclear why Capcom decided on the cloud for bringing a port of 'Resident Evil 7' to the Nintendo Switch. However, some might have already speculated that the decision may be due to possible hardware constraints.

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Although the Switch's SoC has been proven to be quite competent when rendering modern software, it isn't perfect. In fact, some titles have skipped the console completely due to its inability to render certain sophisticated elements.

Another possible reason is that Capcom developers are testing cloud streaming on the Nintendo Switch as part of a new initiative for distribution on the eShop. This would prove beneficial for both parties especially in the case of the first scenario. Streaming games as opposed to rendering them on the console would allow developers to sidestep the Switch's hardware limitations.

Also, the software which has become bloated due to bigger assets in modern gaming technology would be managed better by installing it offsite as opposed to the Switch's onboard drive. However, as Capcom has already pointed out, the one con with this distribution method is that it requires a stable internet connection. Still, it could lead to more titles being readily available for the Switch in the near future.