The average 14-year-old student is just beginning high school. However, that's not the case for 14-year-old Carson Huey-You. On Saturday, May 13, he became the youngest person to ever graduate fromTexas Christian University. He was one of 2,010 students getting degrees from the school in Fort Worth, Texas. This number includes students receiving their undergraduate, graduate and doctorate degrees inside the Ed and Rae Schollmaier Arena.

About the graduate

Huey-You graduated with a #Bachelor Of Science degree in physics and minors in math and Chinese. He was only 11 years old when he enrolled in Texas Christian University in 2013.

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Huey-You said he learned so many new things in college. He insists that he is just a normal dude. He plans to return to the same university next fall to work on getting degrees in quantum mechanics. After that, he wants to get a doctorate in the same subject so he can teach and test some of his ideas.

The graduate's mother said she first realized her son was really smart when he indicated he wanted to learn calculus at the age of 3.

Carson has always excelled in his studies. He was 10 when he graduated from Accommodated Learning Academy as valedictorian before going to college at age 11. It is interesting that Carson graduated from college before he learned to drive and began to date.

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Now, looking back on his time at Texas Christian, Carson indicated that it was scary at first because his #High School was only one building and he went to a school on a big campus with masses of people. He soon adjusted to his new environment. Because of his age at the time, he made headlines in the community and on social media. After all, it is rare for a tween to be in college.

Advice to others

The recent graduate tells other kids his age to stay focused on what they are doing. He further advises young people to stay with it even when things seem really challenging. He related that he had to deal with some real hard classes. He indicated that his three hardest classes were American environmental history, general chemistry II and classical mechanics which is an advanced physics course.

Carson believes that with determination and hard work any kid can do what he did. In fact, he is taking his own advice and not slowing down. He is proud that he has been a positive influence on his brother who is following in his footsteps. Carson's 11-year-old brother Cannan Huey-You will begin working on his Bachelor of Science degree in astronomy at the same school next fall.