In February, DC Comics and Warner Bros. announced that the villain in the upcoming "Wonder Woman" movie would be Ares, the God of War. Director Patty Jenkins spoke to ComicBook.com about the upcoming movie and said that there was a specific reason that Ares was chosen as the bad guy. As Jenkins said, the idea with this first "Wonder Woman" movie was to "go big or go home."

Wonder Woman vs. Ares

The option to choose Ares makes sense for a lot of reasons.

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For one thing, Wonder Woman meets Steve Trevor in the movie during World War I, changing their relationship and removing him from the present-day DC Comics movie timeline. Since World War I is underway and Trevor tells Diana in the movie trailers that she is in danger, it makes sense to use the God of War.

Patty Jenkins said that Ares is the biggest villain in the world of Wonder Woman and using him was just the right thing to do to make sure that the best was shown up front. Geoff Johns, the head of DC Comics, said that there is not a second movie greenlit yet so this gives them a chance to really go out big in case this is the only movie in the series for the Amazonian warrior.

Patty Jenkins on Joss Whedon

One of the big selling points for "Wonder Woman" is not only that it is the first female-led superhero movie since Marvel kicked things off again with "Iron Man," but is also the first superhero movie since then to have a female director. DC Comics hired Patty Jenkins after Marvel removed her from "Thor: Dark World" and it was seen as a positive move, adding a female director to the very popular comic book genre and also adding a female touch to a major female character.

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There is now another female-led movie that DC Comics is working on but this time they chose a male director in Joss Whedon to direct "Batgirl." However, when asked about Whedon directing "Batgirl," Jenkins had nothing but good things to say. According to Jenkins, there are few people better than Whedon at depicting strong female action heroes, as evident by his work on "Buffy the Vampire Slayer."