Memories of the Unabomber were brought back by the recent Austin, Texas bomber, Mark Anthony Conditt. Conditt conducted his attacks on March 2, through March 20, [VIDEO]using a total of six bombs, killing two people while injuring four others.

On March 20, Austin Police were able to zero in on a suspect affiliated with the bombings that were taking place for almost three weeks. According to CNN, the bombs were being made out of household items which could be bought from any local hardware store, which gave the officers the advantage to track purchases and receipts from local stores to help narrow the search for the suspect.

These bombs included items such as nails, metal, and other bomb-making materials.

Austin, Texas finally gets relief after three weeks

Police were able to track Mark Conditt at a hotel where he sat inside his vehicle. While police were waiting for back up, Mark Conditt started his vehicle and drove as far as Interstate 35, where he sat waiting for police and the SWAT team before detonating a bomb loaded to his vehicle and taking his own life [VIDEO]. At first, Austin police thought the bombings were meant for specific people until a third bomb detonated showing anyone close would be injured. The victims killed in this attack were Anthony Stephan House, who was only 39 years old, and Draylen Manson, a 17-year-old musician.

Police considered Conditt to be a serial bomber due to the skill needed to assemble the bombs that were created.

Even after his death, police are still unclear how many extra bombs are lingering around waiting to explode. Mark Anthony Conditt mailed different packages through the FedEx company which contained homemade bombs. Police are unsure of how many packages may still be around. Austin police are requesting any suspicious packages to be reported to the police.

Conditt's actions resemble the Unabomber

The actions that Mark Conditt used were very similar to the same actions as Ted Kaczynski, the Unabomber who killed three people and injured many throughout 20 years. The bombs created by both individuals required skill and specific knowledge. According to People Crime, the Unabomber’s lead FBI Investigator claims that Mark Conditt “sent his message from his very first bombing.” Fitzgerald also states that he is surprised that Conditt had not reached out toward the media in any way before ending his life because many people want someone to know the reason behind their actions, even if it does not make sense.