As the debate over gun reform in the United States heats up, representatives for the National Rifle Association (NRA) have come out with an aggressive defense. In response, survivors from the recent school shooting in Parkland, Florida have taken steps to poke holes in the NRA's argument.

Parkland on NRA

Two weeks ago in the halls of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, 19-year-old Nikolas Jacob Cruz opened fire on his former classmates shortly after 2 p.m. local time. By the time Cruz was finally apprehended and taken into custody by law enforcement, 17 people had been killed, with others left injured.

In the aftermath, the debate over gun control in the country became the number one issue, leading to the White House holding a "listening session" with survivors of school shootings, while CNN held their own town hall event on the subject.

One of the names that has since become linked to the defense [VIDEO] of gun rights and the NRA has been spokeswoman Dana Loesh, who faced criticism following her appearance at the aforementioned town hall. On Sunday morning, Loesh appeared on ABC's "This Week" and delivered a fiery defense of the NRA and the organisation's talking points.

In response, two students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas appeared later on the show, with David Hogg making sure to hit back at Loesh. "Kids are not going to accept this," Hogg said, while adding, "We’re going to have to look very hard at the foundation of this country."

"Listen to Dana” David Hogg said. "Is she really speaking to you guys, is she trying to fight for you guys?" Hogg asked, before wondering, "Or is she actually trying to fight for the gun lobby?" Not stopping there, Hogg doubled down on his criticism of Dana Loesh, saying, "Everything she’s saying seems like spectacle."

Trump's solution

While supporters and opponents of gun control continue to debate [VIDEO] the issue, Donald Trump and the White House have revealed several controversial proposals. Earlier this week, Trump suggested arming teachers at schools to help prevent school shootings, even going as far as recommending a financial bonus for teachers who decide to carry a gun. As expected, critics were quick to hit back, pointing out that additional guns would only make matters worse by causing increased tension and fear, as well as confusion. The president has since stood by his suggestions, doing so in several tweets sent out over the weekend.