Cancellation season arrived in a major way this week. Several comedies fell on Thursday. On Friday, seemingly half of the current television slate went the way of the dinosaur.

The TV landscape is going to look much different next year. That much we've already learned. How different remains to be seen. There are still several shows hanging on the precipice of disaster, including the polarizing "Gotham." There's also the increasing practice of other networks saving canceled shows, which just saved "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" from a controversial cancellation; NBC will take the show from FOX.

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Let's mourn the most promising TV Shows we lost this week.

'Lucifer'

"Lucifer" is one of the shows [VIDEO] that received a major social media backing after its cancellation was announced.

Alas, three seasons is likely all the TV show is getting. "Lucifer" focused on the Devil himself, who abandoned Hell for Los Angeles and an eventual role with the LAPD. The drama, based on a comic-book, saw its rating slide year-after-year, but critical reception for the show actually bumped up. The show is currently being shopped around for a savior. The show's DC connections could help it land on a streaming service.

'Designated Survivor'

The folks at "Designated Survivor," including star Kiefer Sutherland, though a third season was coming. They were wrong. The political drama sometimes lacked direction - too much focus on action sequences, not enough on pertinent weekly political dilemmas.

Going through a handful of showrunners didn't help either. Still, there were enough interesting characters that could've boosted a third season. Instead, the TV show will suddenly come to an end this Wednesday.

'Great News'

It wasn't "Great News" for this NBC comedy. After just two short seasons, the plucky news laugher got the boot. You knew the show was in trouble when Tina Fey's guest appearances went through the roof, a last-ditch effort to save the program. In a lot of ways, the TV program was a formulaic NBC gaffe, following predecessors "The Office" and "Parks and Recreation." But the ensemble was too funny to ignore. Nicole Richie was an unexpected delight. There's never a dull moment with John Michael Higgins. There just wasn't enough pizzazz around the show or chemistry from the two leading actors. Now, we'll sadly have to return to the drab doldrums the nightly news provides us on a daily basis.