When Universal's "The Mummy" reboot was announced in 2012, it was packaged as part of the studio's brand new "Dark Universe" franchise. The often recreated tale of supernatural Egyptian royalty was expected to kick-off a blockbuster series of monster movies including "Frankenstein," "Bride of Frankenstein," "Dracula," and the "Invisible Man." Perennial Hollywood favorites Johnny Depp, Angelina Jolie, and Dwayne Johnson have all been attached to star in future releases. Unfortunately, the studio may see their universe fall apart before they even have a chance to finish building it if its inaugural release fails to deliver at the box office as many experts are anticipating.

Studio spent big, will be disappointed

The 5th "Mummy" movie to premiere in the past two decades, and the first in this new series, Cruise's reboot cost a reported $125 million to produce and has run an expensive marketing campaign that included a costly ad with ESPN during the NBA playoffs. The film also partnered with female-focused brands like Saks Fifth Avenue and M.A.C. cosmetics and created an exclusive VR experience for SXSW, but it would seem all of those added expenses will not pay off for the film's producers. The monster movie is currently projected to earn less than $40 million when it opens this weekend.

The film also partnered with female-focused brands like Saks Fifth Avenue and M.A.C. cosmetics and created an exclusive VR experience for SXSW, but it would seem all of those added expenses will not pay off for the film's producers.

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The monster movie is currently projected to earn less than $40 million when it opens this weekend.

While "The Mummy" isn't facing any serious competition from new movies when it opens on Friday, it will be up against DC Film's juggernaut "Wonder Woman," which had a spectacular debut last weekend, earning over $100 million. The superhero epic is expected to easily hold onto the number 1 spot at the box office through Sunday.

Last 3 Cruise movies have had weak opening weekends

"The Mummy" seems to be proof that Cruise isn't the box office draw that he was in years' past. Once capable of producing a string of consecutive #1 box office hits, his movies now tend to rely heavily on international audiences to recoup studio investments. ("Mission Impossible" earned more than half of its $80 million production costs back during its 1996 opening weekend and went on to bring in more than $180 million in the U.S., while last year's "Jack Reacher: Never Look Back" couldn't reach the $60 million it cost to make during its entire 12 weeks domestic run.)

Audiences may be growing tired of an aging Cruise, who continues to release 1-2 movies annually, but no longer traditionally promotes them; late night talk show interviews tend to fall to co-stars or lesser actors in each film.

Of the last three movies released by Cruise, only one has topped more than $30 million during its opening weekend -- "Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation" earned $55.5 million, or roughly 1/3 of its production budget -- while 2014's "Edge of Tomorrow" nearly finished outside of the Top 3.

This weekend, "The Mummy" may fall victim to both Cruise-fatigue, as well as audiences' waning interest in reboots and franchise movies. With an early Metacritic score of 35/100, the movie could use a Hollywood miracle, (or some ancient Egyptian magic,) to save it.