Many "Stranger Things" fans have been wondering why character Dustin is missing his two front teeth although he is in middle school. Gaten Matarazzo has finally opened up about the rare genetic disorder his character has on the show and he just so happens to have it himself.

Gaten Matarazzo speaks up about having cleidocranial dysplasia

Gaten Matarazzo's fame and success have been soaring since "Stranger Things" hit Netflix. He has been appearing on many talk shows and interviews alongside his co-stars Millie Bobby Brown, Caleb McLaughlin, and Finn Wolfhard. He's also done some interviews where he talks about his rare genetic condition and how his character on the show, Dustin, has brought awareness to the matter.

Matarazzo's condition is called "cleidocranial dysplasia." When he and his co-stars stopped by the "Johnathon Ross Show" to promote their Netflix hit, he took some time to talk about the matter and explain what the disorder actually is. Gaten explains that when you have cleidocranial dysplasia, you're born without your collarbones. He explains how it affects your facial growth, skull growth, and your teeth. He then admits that that is the reason why he didn't have any teeth and that the teeth he has now are fake! 

"I have teeth, but they're all baby teeth. I need a lot of surgery!" He tells Johnathon Ross.

The Duffer Brothers incorporate Gaten Matarazzo's condition into his character's story

Since the condition impacts Matarazzo's speech, The Duffer Brothers decided to make cleidocranial dysplasia a part of Dustin's story.

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Gaten Matarazzo talked about how he feels as though putting his condition in the show has brought much awareness to it and to the many other people in the world who have it. He states that he is very lucky that his is mild and that there are people out there who have it much worse than he does. Gaten also explains that despite his personal case not being passed down by genes, cleidocranial dysplasia is typically hereditary and now that it is in his genes, he has a 50 percent chance of passing it down to his future children and that it could be much worse for them.

Gaten also explains that despite his personal case not being passed down by genes, cleidocranial dysplasia is typically hereditary and now that it is in his genes, he has a 50 percent chance of passing it down to his future children and that it could be much worse for them.

While he's worried about his future children, hopefully, him bringing awareness to the condition will help to pave a somewhat easier path for not only them but anyone else dealing with this rare disorder.