The Coronavirus death toll in the United States continued to pull away from the rest of the world on Wednesday, as the country recorded more than 2,000 deaths from the pandemic for the second consecutive day, according to data from the population statistics site Worldometers.

By 6:00 PM Eastern Time, the U.S. had recorded 2,336 deaths from COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the novel coronavirus. That total was still short of the 2,407 deaths recorded on Tuesday, but up from the 1,535 who died on Monday from the virus.

Wednesday's death tally brought the total number of coronavirus victims who have died in America as of April 15 to 28,383, according to the Worldometers data.

That total number of deaths has accumulated in under seven weeks, since the first COVID-19 death in the U.S. was recorded on February 29.

U.S. leads the world in COVID deaths

Deaths in the United States now account for about 21 percent (roughly one of every five deaths) in the world due to the pandemic. Coronavirus has now killed more than 134,007 people worldwide.

The coronavirus death toll in the United States continued to pull away from the rest of the world on Wednesday, as the country recorded more than 2,000 deaths from the pandemic for the third consecutive day, according to data from the population statistics site Worldometers.

By 6:00 PM Eastern Time, the U.S. had recorded 2,336 deaths from COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the novel coronavirus.

That total was still short of the 2,407 recorded on Tuesday, but higher from the 2,299 who died on Monday from the virus.

Wednesday's death tally brought the total number of coronavirus victims who have died in America as of April 15 to 28,383, according to the Worldometers data. That total number of deaths has accumulated in under seven weeks, since the first COVID-19 death in the U.S.

was recorded on February 29.

The U.S. total stood at 6,738 more than in Italy, the country with the second-highest official coronavirus death toll in the world.

Measured in terms of the ratio between deaths and population, however, the U.S. fares somewhat better. As of late Wednesday, the U.S. rate of 86 deaths per one million members of the population was ranked 14th in the world.

By comparison, Sweden, which has taken a "light touch" when it comes to social distancing and shutdown measures, according to a Guardian report, ranked 10th in death per million, with 119.

The tiny southern European Republic of San Marino, with a population of just 34,000, has been the worst-hit country in the world, in terms of the death rate. With 36 deaths as of Wednesday, San Marino residents are dying of coronavirus infections at a rate of 1,061 per million.

More COVID-19 cases in the U.S. than any other country

The U.S. passed the 100,000 mark in total coronavirus cases on March 30. But in just over two weeks since then, the overall American caseload has multiplied exponentially, to 641,410 — nearly one of every three cases on the planet.

The global total shot past 2 million on Wednesday, according to Worldometers.

Other countries have experienced similar spikes. On March 30, Brazil reported 3,904 cases, with 114 deaths. But as of April 15, the South American country had recorded 28,320 cases, with 1,736 deaths.

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