The need for a good first Impression that captivates cannot be overemphasized. The adage “You never get a second chance to make a First impression” is a notion that is universally known. It dictates that there are certain ways to act when meeting someone for the first time. We know many of these rules because over centuries, they have been passed down to us. But how many of these rules still apply to the modern society? Actually, some don't, some do. Those that still fit in into present time need some readjustment. But first, what are the two must-knows to make an indelible first impression? Psychologist Leil Lowndes has written often about this very subject and her research was used as a resource for this article.

First impression: Does the eye work wonders?

Maintaining great eye contact is thought to be very important when conversing with fellows. It has the capacity to make your listeners really intrigued by whatever message you are conveying and also it exhibits how intelligent and how much of an absolute thinker you are! Businessmen and women, professionals [VIDEO] alike from all walks of life use “the eye effect” strategically for optimal efficacy. They hope to endear their clients, listeners or whoever to themselves while they are yet speaking.

Of course, this works in a relationship setup as well. How can you spot lovers that are in love with each other? For one, there’s increased eye connectivity between them. Intense eye contact between opposite sex is thought to be appealing and it does attract potential love partners.

Let your eye stay in contact for an extra second when speaking. It is a sure way to spread bounds of happiness with the folks you meet.

First impression: The smiling effect

One other tactic to make a noteworthy first impression is to Smile. Smiling communicates a distinctive message to its recipients. It is hugely assumed “smilers” quite often are open, approachable, and likable persons [VIDEO]. But do the old-fashioned kind of smiles work wonders today? Not exactly. In fact, it is regarded the quick-show-your-teeth sort of smile is thought to be sycophantic and not genuine.

Researchers like Leil Lowndes have found out that people tend to be more responsive when you show a smile that makes them feels it was uniquely made for them. To show this, you need to grin really slowly and not in a way that portrays it was somewhat made for all and anyone would be a beneficiary. Instead, look into a person’s face, hold a gaze for a second or two and then slowly release a smile that over floods your face. Emphasis should be placed on the timing of your smile. See a reason to smile and slowly let your smile erupt on your face. So why not give this a try?