Would you trust a "sherlock" villain's words? Andrew Scott, who plays Benedict Cumberbatch's nemesis on the series, recently gave fans an update on where things are headed after season 4, which last aired in January.

The actor revealed in an interview that the show has not been canceled as far as he knows and that a fifth season could still happen. But it will take "Sherlock" to roll production for Season 5 for "another couple of years" as according to Scott, everyone has gotten quite busy with different movie projects.

Delay is good

Andrew Scott, however, believes there's no reason for fans to be upset by the delay because it will help keep "Sherlock" fresh.

In previous interviews, the actor also noted how co-creator Mark Gatiss ascertained that the show could return without shortchanging fans about the story.

"We left it in a place where we thought we could leave it," Scott said, adding, "[we left] equally in a place where we could come back to it."

BBC executives, meanwhile, are optimistic that "Sherlock" will be back on the air sometime in 2019. Star Benedict Cumberbatch said that he's also not closing any doors and if the timing is right, then the cast and crew can always do more episodes.

In January, Benedict Cumberbatch even extended his contract with the show for two more years. This, despite his busy commitments to the Marvel Cinematic Universe as the lead in "Doctor Strange" and as part of the "Avengers."

Ending for good?

Last season's numbers, however, might swing the network's decision to end the show for good.

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This is because "Sherlock" season 4 did not return on air to big ratings as the show used to enjoy.

It prompted some fans to say the series might have jumped the shark. But part of the reason why the show lost nearly half its viewers was that it took "Sherlock" one and a half years to return with new episodes. Thus, fans believe this new delay might completely ruin the show's ratings.

In the U.S., "Sherlock" airs on PBS, which is also the show's co-producer with the BBC. The series first ran in 2010 and earned nearly 97 percent on the Rotten Tomatoes rating site.

Critics also loved that the show lent a fresh take on an iconic character from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's books. Purist, however, said "Sherlock" deviated a lot from Doyle but the show was quite well-received and earned nearly 12 million viewers. "Sherlock" also received several recognitions from award-giving bodies including the Emmys for writing and directing in a miniseries.