President Donald Trump was celebrating in the Rose Garden of the White House on Thursday with the backdrop of a small victory in the House of Representatives. House Republicans narrowly passed by the thinnest of margins a replacement bill for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act by a narrow margin of 217-213.

After the passage of the "replacement" bill, the American Health Care Act of 2017 in the U.S. House, the action moves onto to the U.S. Senate. However, Republican Senators warn that any bill coming out of the Upper Chamber will not look anything like the "disastrous" bill passed by all but 20 House Republicans.

House bill moves to the U.S. Senate

After the passage of the "replacement" bill, the American Health Care Act of 2017 in the U.S. House, the action moves onto to the U.S. Senate. However, Republican Senators warn that any bill coming out of the upper chamber will not look anything like the "disastrous" bill passed by all but 20 House Republicans. Up until the last minute, Trump was arm-twisting many, including Rep. Fred Fred Upon (R-MI) and Rep. Billy Long (R-MO), flipping their votes under extreme pressure. Both could be vulnerable in 2018.

The victory dance in the end zone by President Trump may be short-lived, with the real challenge coming in the United States Senate in order to pass a "repeal and replace" bill to Obama's legacy legislation.

Senate Republicans will 'trash' and 'rewrite' the House bill

According to Mike Allen of Axios.com, the U.S. Senate will scrap the House action and "radically rewrite" the bill.

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The timeline could take a month or two. The key players in the Senate will include will be Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, the chairman of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions, and Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri, a member of GOP leadership. Another key player, Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, said to Axios.com that they will start with a "clean slate" in the Senate.

David Nather of Axios.com says that the goal in the Senate is fourfold. First, helping people who don't have any other insurance options. Secondly, the lowering of premiums. Third, giving the states flexibility on Medicaid and at the same time not "pulling the rug out from under people." Lastly, assuring that people "pre-existing conditions" are protected as they are under Obamacare.

The unintended consequences for the House Republicans will be their vulnerability in the 2018 election, according to the Cook Report. Republicans are vulnerable in 20 House districts.