Is it permissible for a judge to wear political paraphernalia in the courtroom? Apparently it is -- at least in Austin, Texas. On Tuesday, a social media post showing Judge Sarah eckhardt of Travis County presiding over her courtroom while wearing a "pussy hat" -- the pink, knitted headpiece resembling cat ears which became a national symbol of the feminist movement after the Women's March on Washington -- sparked outrage on Reddit, with many questioning the legality of a judge making a political statement from the bench.

KVUE investigates legality of judge's behavior

Austin's KVUE looked into the matter and concluded that Judge Eckhardt's wearing of the so-called "pussy hat" didn't violate any rules. In Travis County, notes KVUE, the county judge is an elected position. The county judge is tasked with overseeing the commissioners court, and fulfilling other duties typically associated with that of a county commissioner. Jason Puckett of KVUE's investigative team spoke with several county officials and was repeatedly told the same thing -- basically, that a sitting judge can wear whatever silly headpiece her liberal heart desires.

Eckhardt's track record of liberal activism

Judge Eckhardt, who is the daughter of the late liberal congressman Bob Eckhardt, has a lengthy history of using her position to support left-wing causes.

In October of 2015, Eckhardt met with immigration activists in an attempt to bolster Austin's position as a sanctuary city amid attempts by the U.S. Senate to defund cities that refuse to comply with federal immigration law.

In June of last year, while attending a naturalization ceremony in Texas as a guest of honor, Judge Eckhardt encouraged the 1,210 newly-naturalized citizens to vote against Donald Trump.

Discuss this news on Eunomia

“I have a problem with her using her title and position to make what I thought was particularly political comments to a captive audience," said Kyle Hood, husband to one of the naturalization ceremony participants, to Lana Shadwick, a former judge and legal analyst for Breitbart Texas.