The Government of Bali has issued an extraordinary plea to the peoples of the world. Despite its volcano rumbling since August, the government's tourist office claims that The Island paradise is ''still safe for tourism.'' On Sunday night more than 300 tremors were recorded with smoke rising from the crater to a height of 200 meters. This is official information from the government, which has, itself, evacuated more than 80,000 residents from the immediate area. The United States and Australian governments have issued travel warnings to all those thinking of traveling to Bali. Meanwhile, the authorities in Bali remain defiant.

Bali recently hosted President Obama

Recognized as one of the most beautiful islands on the planet, Bali is known for the charm and friendliness of its people, as much as for its loveliness, and is the destination for millions of tourists each year.

As recently as last June, President Obama, along with Michelle Obama and their daughters, spent five days enjoying the island. According to the government, all flights are still running normally with no disruption to tourism. However, it admits that alternative airports are on standby, should volcanic ash be detected. It also claims that 300 buses would be made available to channel tourists to the safety of ferry ports and bus terminals, throughout Bali, if necessary.

Volcano activity is increasing on Bali

The volcano on Bali, Mount Agung, last erupted in 1963, but with its increased activity, the government is taking no chances. Indonesia, itself, has prepared Jakarta, Banyuwangi, Makassar, Kupang, Balikpapan, Ambon, Surabaya, Manado, Praya, and Solo airports for emergency use, should the situation deteriorate.

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Of course, Indonesia, with more than 100 active volcanoes, is no stranger to preparing for the increased seismic activity. However, with school holidays approaching in Australia, Bali will be expecting an influx of Australian families.

Bali volcano 'magma is moving to the surface'

Certainly, experts are taking the possibility of the volcano erupting very seriously. Quoted in The Guardian newspaper, associate professor, Scott Bryan, from the Queensland University of Technology said, “The fact that the seismic tremors beneath the volcano are increasing in number, intensity, and the reduction in their depth in the last week or so, is a very good indication that magma is moving up to the surface.”

For now, the world waits and watches Bali.