As the list of 80’s sequels and remakes keeps growing, the question is whether these are movies that audiences can't wait to see or if Hollywood is simply running out of original ideas. With the budgets often required to make summer blockbusters studios seem reluctant to take chances on anything besides proven franchises.

Ghostbusters Reboot is Hoping to Be 'Who You Gonna Call'

Adding to the appeal for female audiences of this reboot of Ghostbusters, photos of actor Chris Hemsworth surfaced as Kevin the receptionist.

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This rounds out the all-female lineup - Melissa McCarthy and Kristen Wiig along with Kate McKinnon and Leslie Jones from Saturday Night Live.

On Tuesday, Director Paul Feig announced the official website and the scheduled release of the first trailer at the end of the month. Already at a budget of over $154 million the real test for this franchise reboot will be the scheduled release in July.

Will Repeating Beetlejuice Bring Good Luck 

On Late Night with Seth Myers, Winona Ryder confessed that Tim Burton, director of the original, had announced that she will be in Beetlejuice 2.

While she admits that there are no other details, Ryder says that the amount of appeal for the original Beetlejuice movie surprises her. 

While the 1990 first attempt at a sequel will most likely never be made, the current script that Burton is apparently using was written after Warner Bros. approached writer Seth Grahame-Smith in 2011.

Where Do Remakes and Sequels Cross the Line

Along with the announcement of Tom Cruise that he will be making Top Gun 2, the question is whether these are really movies meant to be made?

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Certainly, nostalgia has an enduring appeal as we’ve seen with the success of musical specials like Grease Live. And audiences also love to see their favorite stars like actor Bill Murray return in stories that are familiar and proven.

But at what point does revisiting old territory just become a rehash of worn out material?

Some audience members suggest that studios are not open to new creative ideas while others think that the problem lies with how people continue to choose established franchises over the unfamiliar.

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