2017 has become a nightmare year for the White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer. the media has even caricatured a character based on him on Saturday Night Live, thanks to Sean’s eccentricities the script writes itself.

This week, we witnessed yet another faux pas by the White House Press Secretary. India’s Prime Minister is on a three-nation tour which includes the United States. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be meeting POTUS Donald Trump and will be among the first world leaders to have dinner with him. Prime Minister Modi and President Trump have a lot in common as world leaders, both share a common interest in right-wing ideology.

As India and the US look forward to strengthening ties with each other, Indian press remained eager to White House’s official statements regarding the upcoming meet. To Indians utter surprise and amusement, White House Press Secretary, in an official statement wished Indians Happy 70th Independence Day, two months prior to the actual day.

Throughout the day, Sean Spicer remained the subject of ridicule trending in India’s social media.

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This isn’t the first time a politician a has shown lack of homework when it comes to dealing with a foreign nation.

This is not the first time Sean Spicer has received criticism. Since he started working as the White House’s Press Secretary, Sean Spicer continues to falter in his new role. Whether it is the “alternative facts” fiasco during the Trump’s inauguration briefing or when he referred to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as 'Joe Trudeau of Canada.' It is possible that within a short time, Sean Spicer might be relieved of his duties considered the increasing criticism from insiders as well as the American press. But to say he is the only one who doesn't do his homework before a press briefing would be wrong.

Earlier this month, Megyn Kelley said during an interview with Russian president Vladimir Putin met India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi and asked him if he’s on twitter. Narendra Modi is currently world’s second most followed politician on Twitter.

Maybe this is a friendly reminder to the American journalists that some of them need to put extra effort before reporting on foreign affairs or releasing statements about foreign nations. Not only will it save them goodwill but will also set a lesson to foreign correspondents who look up to the Fourth Estate for lessons in journalism.