A landscaper in Phoenix, Arizona, is blaming employees at a local Motel 6 for the visit he received from federal immigration agents while he was a guest at the motel recently. Manuel Rodriguez-Juarez, 33, said he reserved a room in June to get away from home during a spat with his girlfriend. He reportedly showed the front desk clerk the only identification he had -- a voter card issued in Mexico -- when he checked in.

Later that evening, he said three U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents knocked on his door. After confirming his unauthorized status, the agents transported him to a detention center about an hour outside of Phoenix.

Rodriguez-Juarez said he assumes "it was a Motel 6 person" who reported him, explaining he does not know "who else would have told them."

A record of reporting guests?

According to the Phoenix New Times, Motel 6 locations in the valley have a history that suggests employees regularly notify federal authorities of guests suspected of being undocumented residents. Between February and August of this year, public records indicate ICE made at least 20 arrests -- and likely many more -- at two such motels. Both businesses are located in areas of the city with a large Latino population.

While management officially declined to comment, the New Times report included confirmation from staff members that they routinely report guests to immigration officials.

One unnamed clerk said staff performs an audit each morning "and we push a button and it sends it to ICE."

As for ICE, a representative did not confirm or deny that Motel 6, or any other lodge in the area, was the source of these tips.

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ICE spokesperson Yasmeen Pitts O'Keefe said that if the agency "hypothetically" showed up somewhere and went on to "administratively arrest some folks," that would not be evidence that anyone in particular supplied the tip.

More immigration controversy for Phoenix

The speculation surrounding these Motel 6 locations in Phoenix comes as the area deals with the aftermath of divisive former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio's controversial pardon by President Donald Trump.

Arpaio, who was found guilty of civil contempt of court for refusing to abide by a judge's order to refrain from detaining residents based on their racial appearance, was set to be sentenced to as much as six months behind bars. Trump stepped in before sentencing to issue a pardon, which critics are calling unconstitutional.