On Tuesday, Michael Phelps won gold medals in the 200-meter butterfly and 4 x 200 freestyle relay, giving him 21 gold medals over four Olympics. As such, he may not just be the greatest Olympic swimmer of all time, but maybe even the greatest American Olympian in the modern Games’ 120-year history. Those 21 gold medals, in fact, put him far ahead of everyone else in terms of the Olympics’ top gold medal winners of all time. But he may also have tied another record at Rio, one that had supposedly stood for close to 2,200 years.

Michael Phelps tied Leonidas of Rhodes’ record from 152 BCE

As pointed out earlier today by Olympic researcher Hilary Evans, Phelps now shares a record with runner Leonidas of Rhodes, who, in 152 BCE, made it four consecutive Olympics where he finished first place in three separate events. From 164 to 152 BCE, Leonidas had won gold medals in three ancient foot races, but it’s also been stressed that the record may be of “dubious” nature.

According to Chris Chase of FOX Sports, historians have various primary sources for information on ancient events, such as the earliest Olympic Games. These sources, he said “provide more of an outline than anything,” and that’s the reason why Phelps’ tying of the record is best taken “with a dollop of olive oil.” Still, Chase acknowledged that such a milestone does make for a good story ahead of his next Olympic appearances, two of which are taking place later on today.

Phelps scheduled to compete in at least two more events at Rio Olympics

With the 200-meter butterfly and 4x200 freestyle relay now completed, Phelps will be gunning for what could be more gold medals to add to his illustrious collection. The 31-year-old super-swimmer will be competing in the 200-meter men’s individual medley final at 10 p.m. ET tonight, as well as the 100-meter men’s butterfly semifinals, which take place about a half-hour later.

If Phelps makes it to the finals of the latter event as expected, he will take part in the 100-meter butterfly finals at 9:12 p.m. ET on Friday, August 11.

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