When Chicago Cubs clashed against Nationals and scored a 5-2 victory on Thursday night, Jason Heyward was hoping he could play. CSN Chicago had previously reported that Jason was not in the line-up, but Heyward felt that he “needed to play,” so he prepared himself for the match.

Fowler out the game.

When umpire Vic Carapazza had enough of Dexter Fowler’s arguments over balls and strikes Jason Hayward got his chance.

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Before the match, Cubs manager Joe Maddon told UPI that he did not want to rush him back into the game, even though he was “looking good.”

Jason tried to play through his pain.

Joe Madden was a bit cautious about getting Jason out there and wanted to be certain that all was well with the injury that Jason did to his wrist in Phoenix when the cubs played the Arizona Diamondbacks. He tried to play through the pain but eventually he knew he needed to get help.

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His determination to play through his injury might stem back from 2011, when he was publicly criticized for NOT playing through a shoulder injury, by Chipper Jones. Jones had said that even at “80% fit Heywood was still 80% better” than most people playing the league. Although he did call Heyward and explain that he did not mean to criticize him for taking the time to heal his jury – this kind of thing has a way of lodging itself in the human brain.

This might be why he was so determined to continue to play; to measure up as the man who is "worth his salt." Working through the pain and hiding injuries is not a great idea when you have the pressure of a large contract over your head. After he got help for his injury Jason sat out three games.

Largest Cubs contract.

Nicknamed the J-Hey Kid, he has one of the largest contracts ever awarded in the history of the Chicago Cubs.

Before signing on with the Cubs, his brilliant career saw him receiving his third Fielding Bible Award and the same number of Golden Glove awards. When he signed up with the cubs on 15th December last year, his $184 million contract made history. 

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