Eddie Jones, a former player for the Stormers, and coach of the 2015 Rugby World Cup-winning Japanese team, conducted the World Rugby workshop held in Los Angeles. Jones is now a coach in England, and spoke about Japan’s success at the 2015 Rugby World Cup. He was the coach that led Japan to victory in the 2015 Rugby World Cup, so attendees were eager to hear what he had to tell them.

Representatives from both of the 10 tier unions came to the World Rugby Workshop. The workshop is meant to review the gains that were made in this year’s World Cup and Tuesday was the last day of the sessions.

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World Rugby Workshop examined player performance issues

During the World Rugby Workshop, the attendees went over all of the statistics from the 2015 World Cup and determined the teams that had bettered their performances from game to game, as well as looking at what didn’t work. Some of the topics were player release, team preparation and assembly time point of view.

The goal is said to be to make Tier Two countries as competitive as possible so that any gap existing between those teams and the higher tier gets less and less every year.

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Coaches and managers were in attendance of Jones’ discussion on the 2015 World Cup game and how any such gains that were made can be strengthened, as well as to learn any of the secrets behind the success of the winners, the Japanese team, the Brave Blossoms, which won 34 to 32 against South Africa, considered to be an historic event putting Asian rugby on the map.

Japan’s rugby win said to give Tier Two countries more confidence

Tier Two countries have reported that they now have more confidence thanks to Japan’s win, and are said to be making more efforts now to play more aggressively and not just try to hold the score down for the other team.

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Accordingly, they have recorded 30 percent more tries at scoring, and have conceded fewer points to opposing teams.

Officials say they have put the bar high, and want to see two Tier Two countries in the quarter finals in 2019’s rugby play. World Rugby Tier Two funding is in its 8th year and they admit this is crucial for them to succeed. So, with all of that at stake, attendees for the World Rugby Workshop listened and talked, with coach Eddie Jones leading the discussions.

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