Roger Federer has his sights set on becoming the oldest male tennis player to win Wimbeldon. This time, the Swiss champion has serious chances to win his 19th major title.

The 33 year-old tennis legend has gained no less than seven titles at the All England Club. However, Federer hasn't won any Grand Slam trophies since 2012, Wimbledon. Now he has a serious chance to win for a record-breaking eighth occasion on the green green grass of Wimbledon. At nearly 34, he would become the oldest grand slam winner since the remarkable success of Ken Rosewall (37) and Andres Gimeno (34) in 1972.

And this year quite anything can happen in the beloved summer grand slam party, there is no clear scenario.

Can good old Roger make history by becoming the first player to have eight titles at the most prestigious tournament in the world? Well, the Swiss has a fair shot at the title this time.

Now Federer is a completely different proposition than it was during his top years. The circumstances have changed: the whole ATP tour became more unpredictable with more and more players hungry for trophies. However, Federer has also changed a lot: his attacking style is more creative than ever before, thanks to his two genius coaches, Stefan Edberg and Severin Luthi. He is no longer the king of 5 sets matches, all four of his titles this season in Brisbane, Dubai, Istanbul and Halle - have come over three sets. In 2015, Federer is playing better than in the last two years, and may be even better in 2015 than he was in 2012.

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"I see the big picture. If I look at last year, I see more the positives than the heart-breaking loss in the final. This time, it has been the best preparation I have ever had" - the tennis legend explained.

He elaborated with the big picture, explaining that "It's probably been the best preparation I've ever had for Wimbledon, because we have a week more on the grass…It's changed everything. The body might feel it after Wimbledon, but the good thing is you can heal problems you might have carried over from the French rather than taking them right away on to the grass."

Well, Roger, fingers crossed for you…