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One might think because there is just not quite enough racial tension and normalizing of hatred in the U.S., A&E Network has decided to add to their TV lineup a reality series covering the KKK at its grassroots level. “Generation KKK” will premiere on January 10th following the lives and struggles of Grand Knighthawk of the North Georgia White Knights – Chris Buckley; North Mississippi White Knights Imperial Wizard – Steven Howard and Richard Nichols, who is the Tennessee Knights of the Invisible Empire’s Grand Dragon.

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The first episode will introduce viewers to the way that members push their beliefs on very impressionable young people. Segments include a scene where the Imperial Wizard expresses his goal to prepare his teenage daughter to take his place. Another member is shown teaching his 4-year-old boy to embrace the KKK’s views, while a fifth-generation Klan family struggle with keeping up the legacy.

Same old story, different century

The racist movement began in 1865 as a declaration of White supremacy and a stance against immigration.

To this day, it is still a base for 5,000 to 8,000 extremists. Oddly, the show is produced by three anti-hate activists who began filming the eight episodes a year and a half ago. Two of the activists are former skinheads. Executive producer Aengus James told the New York Times that it was the activists’ desire for members to see the light of day, and come out of that dark world of destruction and hate crimes. It should be noted that the series does show a member from each family who is trying out the organization.

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Boycotts, protests, and opposition galore

As can be imagined, not everyone is happy about “Generation KKK” and what it stands for coming to a TV near them. The Anti-Defamation League points out the anti-Semitic group for their commitment to extreme violence in an effort to achieve racial segregation and White dominance. Critics took to Twitter stating that the TV project will only serve to normalize the racist group, especially with the rise of the alt-right movement in the wake of Donald Trump’s presidential run.

Yes, there is growing confidence to diss the hood and proudly show your face. Same old story, different century, yet with an almost rubber-stamp of approval for boldness.