American actor Ron Glass passed away at the age of 71 over the Thanksgiving weekend.

Respiratory failure is believed to have been the cause of death

According to a statement from Glass’ agent, Jeffrey Leavett, the actor had died on Friday, November 25, due to respiratory failure. Glass was 71 at the time of his passing. Leavett offered his condolences, saying that Glass had been a “private, gentle and caring man” in life and that would be missed. Canadian-American actor Nathan Fillion, who co-starred with Glass in the "Firefly" franchise, paid homage to the late actor on social media, with a quote from Glass’ character “Not to go far.” No information concerning Glass’ funeral service or surviving family members has currently been made known to the public.

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Glass had a continuously prolific career as an actor

An Evansville, Indiana native, Glass had earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in drama and literature from the University of Evansville. He then made his start in acting in Minneapolis theaters before relocating to Los Angeles. One of Glass’ most prolific roles was that of Sgt. Ron Nathan Harris, a bibliophile police chief who aspired to become a writer, in the police-oriented sitcom "Barney Miller." Glass had notably been nominated for a supporting actor Emmy for the role in 1982.

Later in life, he would also have prominence with the role of Derrial Book in the 2002 cult-classic sci-fi series, "Firefly" and its film-spin-off "Serenity." Glass also was notably cast in an African-American centered reboot of the sitcom “The Odd Couple,” playing an incarnation of Felix Unger.

Millennial viewers may also recognize Glass from his role in the Nineties sitcom "Teen Angel" or as a voice actor for Randy Carmichael in the "Rugrats" cartoon franchise. Other roles for Glass included appearances on "Friends," ''Star Trek: Voyager" and "Designing Women," and more recently, "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" and "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D."

In addition to his acting career, Glass was also notably on the board of directors for Los Angeles' AL Wooten Jr. Heritage Center, an organization dedicated to the safety of inner-city youth, named after a man who had been fatally shot due in part to gang activity.

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