Voice actors from video game companies, as diverse as affiliates with Disney and the WB, announce going on strike in California.

What do we currently know about the strike and who is involved?

The official list of video game companies involved include Activision Publishing Inc., Blindlight, LLC, Corps of Discovery Films, Disney Character Voices, Inc., Electronic Arts Productions, Inc., Formosa Interactive, LLC, Insomniac Games, Inc., Interactive Associates, Inc., Take 2 Interactive Software, VoiceWorks Productions, Inc., and WB Games, Inc.

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SAG-AFTRA, which stands for “Screen Actors Guild: American Federation of Television and Radio Artists,” a powerful union said to represent around 160,000 workers, which can include journalists and actors, called the labor strike effective immediately against these video game companies. According to reports, the strike has been set up after a nineteen-month attempt to negotiate a proper deal with said companies.

The first picket will be on Monday, October 24, and will be located in Electronic Arts in Playa Vista, California, at 10:30 in the morning.

What are the issues involved in the strike?

According to SAG-AFTRA, the three main issues that are to be highlighted by the strike include secondary compensation, a lack of transparency, and employers not taking the voice actors seriously. According to reports, there is currently no secondary compensation structure for the video game actors, which would be an additional payment for downloads and subscribers. According to the strikers, they want a payment plan that would affect games once they've obtained 2 million, 4 million, 6 million, or 8 million copies.

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Added to that, the strike claims that actors are given little information from producers about roles and what they will entail for the workers. The reported problem with this is that actors are often unable to negotiate certain deals and are also unable to make meaningful decisions about the roles.

Finally, the strike highlighted the fact that a plan that took nearly a year and a half falling through is clear validation that employers do not take their workers seriously.

In one reported case, they claimed producers offered to give free tea and water in booths for actors as part of their deal, despite doing such actions already, suggesting that they did not do proper research for what they could offer as part of their own dealing.

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