Every year thousands of horror Movies are made in Hollywood (around the world) but only one of them becomes highly successful to represent that particular year and generation. In other words, only one movie wins the prestigious 'horror film of the year' award (if there was such category, that is?)

I have only covered films like "Psycho" (1960), "The Exorcist" (1973) and the critically acclaimed hit "The Witch" (2015) in detail. Other notable horror movies that have caught people's imagination are "The Shining" (1980), "The Blair Witch Project" (1990), "Saw" (2000) and "It Follows" (2014.)

Alfred Hitchcock changed the horror-genre scene with the introduction of 'the shower scene' in "Psycho" (and in black and white) and Robert Eggers introduced us to "The Witch" - a brilliant film but made out of a spaghetti-mix of many narratives put into one single film.

Psycho (1960)

The ultimate scream film. The film that started it all was "Psycho." Director Alfred Hitchcock's iconic horror movie has earned its place in the pop culture today. The shower scene where Marion Crane gets stabbed and drops dead is the scene that has represented the horror genre ever since.

A murder of the woman - a character looking more like to lead the film than be dead almost straight away - half way through the story and the introduction of Norman Bates (and later 'his mother') in between the film is one of the best story-telling techniques I've ever seen. 

Norman Bates having psychological issues and mental disorder of psychopathic proportions makes the film even more interesting. It almost looks like that Dr. Hannibal Lector of the "The Silence of the Lambs" fame is based on Bates' character.

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The Exorcist (1973)

The Exorcist changed the whole film making scene when it was released in the 70s. It's a film that represents the 1970s in 'the film of the year' category. Even now, celebrities working in the horror movies industry give examples of the film as being the most horrifying. It also introduced the audience to gore and filth and to the most foul-mouthed demon before Quentin Tarantino hit the Hollywood scene in the blood-and-gore genre of filmmaking. It can be argued that Tarantino kind of re-introduced the gore when William Friedkin had introduced 'the bloody genre' with "The Exorcist" already. 

The use of the F word is ripe in the movie. "Fuck me! Fuck me!" shouts the possessed girl after mutilating her genitalia from masturbating with the cross during the exorcism. It's something never been seen before until then. The connection of ancient history -  an ancient satanic statue found during the excavation of Egyptian pharaohs' tombs - with the girl's possession in modern day America is a theme that has been used in other films ever since. 

The Witch (2015)

The Witch (2015) is set in the medieval times when stories of witches and ghost sightings were ripe (it's a folklore story or "a campfire tale".)  A family of six - a husband and wife and their four children -  live deep in the forest in 1630's New England.

The family seems more likely to be hiding from the so-called righteous 17th-century Puritan community than living their existential lives out among the law-abiding citizens.

Elements of films like "The Crucible" (the Salem trials, witchcraft), "The Blair Witch Project" (witchcraft and witch hunt in the woods, ghosts and cries of murdered children abducted by the Blair witch) which represents the 90s, "The Village" (the family living deep in the woods to avoid civilization), "The Others" (the daughter being punished for lying about the witch, the twins talking to demons), "Dracula" (the mother sleeping inside the tomb of her dead son, the blood- and-flesh eating witch), "The Shining" (the father constantly chopping the woods with the big ass axe ) which represents the 80s"The Exorcist" (the foul-mouthed possessed children) and even "Saw" (mutilated bodies) which represents the 2000's, is present through out the critically acclaimed film.