Marvel is adding magic to the superhero mix with the release of "Doctor Strange" on November 4 in the U.S. and October 25 in the U.K. Audiences have already seen superhuman strength ("The Hulk"), genius scientific abilities ("Iron Man"), and even semi-godlike powers ("Thor"), but early reviews and sneak peeks hint that "Doctor Strange" adds a whole new dimension to the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Story of 'Doctor Strange'

The latest Marvel superhero to hit the big screen is Dr. Stephen Strange, a neurosurgeon in New York City.

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After a horrific car accident, he's drawn into the secretive world of magic, parallel dimensions and plots against the real world. "Doctor Strange" continues in the tradition of Marvel anti-heroes as an arrogant, yet brilliant, man who is driven to magic when the accident leaves him unable to perform surgery. He becomes the Supreme Sorcerer, and Earth's savior against supernatural forces along the way.

"Doctor Strange" had its global premiere in Hong Kong last Friday (October 14) with fireworks and fans shrieking for stars Benedict Cumberbatch and Tilda Swinton, along with director Scott Derrickson and producer Kevin Feige.

Behind the scenes -- new featurette

A new featurette takes a peak into the making of the film, with a closer look at the supporting characters played by Rachel McAdams, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Tilda Swinton. McAdams plays Christine Palmer, Dr. Stephen Strange's girlfriend and, as it turns out, the important romantic subplot is a big part of the story. Fans of the Marvel Doctor Strange comics already know that Chiwetel Ejiofor's Baron Mordo begins as Strange's ally, but somewhere along the way, he reveals himself as his arch nemesis.

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It's still unclear from the trailer whether that actually happens during the movie, or whether it may not occur till one of those final post-scenes that gets snuck into the credits, setting up the conflict for the sequel.

There's been a swirl of controversy over the casting of British actress Tilda Swinton as Ancient One, a character who was male and Tibetan in the comic. According to Ign.com, co-screenwriter C. Robert Cargill added to the furor when he claimed back in April that Marvel had cast her to avoid offending the Chinese market, since China does not officially recognize Tibet as a nation.

Marvel issued a statement backing away from that claim, emphasizing Swinton's admittedly considerable acting cred.

Mads Mikkelsen plays a character called Kaecilius, a relatively minor character from the comic books who is essentially a henchman of Baron Mordo's. In the movie, it looks like he's become the main villain in the storyline...but is it just a ruse to hide Baron Mordo's true nature?

Only the film will tell. Marvel's "Doctor Strange" will open in North American and Chinese markets on the same day, with expected U.S.

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box office revenues between $60 and $75 million, according to figures from TheWrap.