What a thriller! During "Dancing With The Stars" Cirque du Soleil week, Olympic gymnast Laurie Hernandez rocked Michael Jackson and earned the first perfect 10 for her jazz dance. The young "Final Five" Olympian tore up the DWTS dance floor while her partner, pro dancer Val Chmerkovskiy struggled to keep up. Judge Julianne Hough was so wowed she proclaimed Hernandez "Queen of Ballroom" to Jackson's King of Pop. 

All that jazz and sass to boot

Exactly what did the 16-year-old Hernandez do that earned her a perfect 10 from 'DWTS' judges? She discovered the secret that so many older dancers like Amber Rose and Ryan Lochte have missed--that spunk is where it's at.

Hernandez went bum-out so to speak and held nothing back in her "flawless" performance of "The Way That You Make Me Feel." The judges have expressed time and again that this kind of chutzpah is the first thing they are looking for from dancers while temerity and reserve are the last.

Hernandez nailed what Lochte, Amber Rose failed

Most anyone can learn dance steps but it takes a very special kind of pluck to do them with passion. It wasn't body-shaming but the lack of zest that earned Amber Rose and Maksim Chmerkovskiy the "uncomfortable" comment from judge Julianne Hough. Half-hearted performances are what put Lochte's and partner Cheryl Burke's dances at sixes and sevens. Where most dancers take it to the edge of technical merit and stop, rock stars like Hernandez go flying over the precipice, damn the torpedoes, grinning all the way. 

Olympics teaches that the devil is in the details

As an Olympian gymnast at the Rio 2016 Olympics games, Hernandez learned attention to detail.

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And she brought that focus with her to "Dancing With The Stars." Dance, like gymnastics, is gestalt. You have to be aware of what each part of your body is doing at every moment. Hernandez exploited dance steps, body movements, gestures, facial expressions, hands, eyes, everything. You could tell that she was expressing Michael Jackson with every fiber of her being. That whole body involvement becomes much more than the sum of the parts.