Mayim Bialik is a well-known celebrity, famous for her roles on "Blossom" and "The Big Bang Theory," but the actress has another side to her. She has a PhD in neuroscience, an aspect of her life as a scientist brought out in her role as Amy Farrah Fowler. She has recently announced that she's written a new book called "Girling up."

Mayim Bialik focuses on female power in her new book

Bialik used her science background to write an advice novel about growing up as a woman having to grow up in today's society with peer pressure and social norms. The full title for the advice novel is "Girling up: How to be strong, smart, and spectacular." She drew from her own experiences while using her science background to appeal to the emotional and psychological side of womanhood.

A few of the topics she covered are first kisses, body image issues, and family responsibilities. It's planned for a May 2017 release. 

Mayim Bialik's first book brought on controversy 

Mayim Bialik is no stranger to the literary world. She previously wrote a vegan cookbook and a more controversial advice book called "Beyond the sling: a real-life guide to raising confident, loving children the attachment parenting way." The scientist/actress uses her real-life experiences as a mother and her study of neuroscience, drawing from her thesis on attachment, to give advice on parenting techniques. 

What is attachment parenting? She endorses attachment parenting in "Beyond the sling." The technique is the idea that the child tells the parent what it needs such as when to stop breast feeding. Her novel also advocates for co-sleeping, child wearing, and gentle discipline.

Top Videos of the Day

Bialik personally prefers co-sleeping, because she can always know what her child needs during the night and can meet those needs on demand. 

Why was Mayim Bialik's book controversial? Her advocating co-sleeping was met with mixed responses. Several health institutes don't recommend co-sleeping, because the risk to their safety increases. The American Academy of Pediatrics discourages sharing a bed with an infant, because it increases the risk of SIDS. On the other side, some studies have shown that under the right circumstances and precautions, such as keeping excess pillows and blankets off the bed, infant co-sleeping can be beneficial. An issue found with "Beyond the sling" was that she didn't share these risks in her chapter about sleep, apart from a sideline warning that you must know the risks first. 

Do you think that Mayim Bialik's next book "Girling up" will also contain controversial advice?