Even since his death in 2009, details from Michael Jackson's 2003 trial regarding accusations of child molestation continue to surface and shed new light on the mysterious life of the pop superstar. According to newly found documents obtained by celebrity News source RadarOnline, investigators had found a very extensive and disturbing collection of images and pornography featuring children in Jackson's possession during the trial. The collection reportedly features both video and photographic evidence, as well as audio recordings and journals. Investigators also found strange collages featuring pictures of children's faces being pasted onto naked adult bodies, and a collection of graphic, often very violent pornographic images featuring both children and adults.

Though it's not known if Jackson was the creator of the video and photographic content, the district attorney on the case believed he used the material to 'desensitize' and groom children for his predatory behavior. 

More evidence surfaces

This discovery of these documents comes to light after new accusations of molestation from more young men have surfaced, revitalizing interest in the case. Some of Jackson's former maids and staff have also opened up in recent interviews and described his sometimes bizarre and troubling behavior. The maids, whose names were kept private, described Michael as a hoarder and drug-addict, whose home was often in such disarray that the maids themselves had to hire more help. One maid, referred to in documents simply as Maid #2, recalled him keeping mountains of items all over the house that included everything from fan art to soiled baby diapers which he wouldn't allow to be thrown away.

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When asked about this newly released evidence by Vanity Fair, the Santa Barbara police department says they did not officially release it to anyone except relevant people during the trial, and that they believe it was leaked by someone from the department. "...The documents appear to be copies of reports that were authored by Sheriff's Office personnel as well as evidentiary photographs taken by Sheriff's Office personnel interspersed with content that appears to be obtained off the Internet or through [an] unknown source," they said in their statement. "The Sheriff's Office did not release any of the documents and/or photographs to the media." The effect this evidence had on Jackson during the 2003 trial, as well as what will happen with the case given its recent public release is still unknown.