In Game of Thrones season 6 episode 9, "Battle of the Bastards", the huge battle between the Starks and the Boltons left breathless millions of fan all over the world. Soon after the episode was aired, director Miguel Sapochnik released an interesting interview to Entertainment Weekly. Here are 10 amazing revelations about the penultimate episode of this season.

The real-life battles that inspired the Battle of the Bastard.

Sapochnik revealed that initially the Battle of the Bastard was based on the huge Battle of Agincourt between French and English soldiers in 1415, a battle won by Henry V against a numerically superior French army.

Due to budget issues, the Battle of the Bastards became more like the Battle of Cannae (216 BC, south-east Italy) in which the army of Carthage lead by Hannibal defeated a larger army of the Roman Republic.

The horses were a serious problem.

Sapochnik revealed why the horses were the biggest problem during the shooting: they need a decently solid ground to run on, they got bored easily and "some perform better than others". They also need a separate field to rest in, and obviously "they sh- and piss all the time"...

Horses being horses during the parlay scene.

Sapochnik recounted that during the parlay scene between Jon, Sansa and Ramsay before the battle, keeping the horses quiet was very difficult: "Getting a bunch of horses to just stand there all day and do nothing is much harder than getting them to run around.

Top Videos of the Day

They would fart and pee a lot, often in the middle of [Kit Harington’s] lines"

Humans were a problem too.

Sapochnik pointed out that there were a lot of difficulties related to the huge amount of people needed to film the battle. The shooting lasted for 25 days: how do you manage hundreds of people on an open field if it suddenly starts to rain? How do you feed 600 people every day? Not to mention how difficult should have been to get the folks riled up enough to fight each other in the mud, stand in the rain and run and fight each other again for 25 days straight.

Rickon's dead: about Ramsay's successful trick.

Sapochnik pointed out that Ramsay's trick was a total success: as you surely noticed watching GOT 6x09, Jon was supposed to wait and be patient, but with his trick Ramsay easily lured him out of his position, forcing Jon's men to charge when they weren't supposed to.

A detail you may haven't noticed.

Speaking of the tactical aspect of the battle Sapochnik remarked that Ramsay ensnares Jon in the almost exactly same way Davos had planned to defeat the Bolton army in the council war scene.

The 'double envelopment pincer move'

The impressive Bolton shield wall, explained the director, was a way to emulate the double envelopment pincer move without the horses. The horses were supposed to be there according to a previous script, but for a reason of budget Sapochnik and the showrunners decided to "transform" the original war tactic (with a remarkable result, I would like to add).

The schedule.

Sapochnik recounted the schedule's negotiate for the battle. Initially, he guessed 28 days, and the produced asked him to do it in 12 days. Then the director and his first assistant revised the number of days needed for the shooting and the number had gone up to 42 days. Finally, they ended up with 25 days of shooting, 10 hours a day.

The Jon almost dead scene wasn't in the script.

Sapochnik recounted that at a certain point it looked impossible to end the shooting in time, so he wrote an email to the showrunners and the producers to suggest an alternative to the original script. The showrunners quickly answered: they were sorry about the situation, but they confirmed their trust in the director. And this is how and why the scene in which Jon Snow almost dies trampled by the wildlings has been shot.

A few words about GOT season 6 finale.

Sapochnik is the director of the season finale as well. About GOT 6x10 the director stated: "It feels equally as epic as episode 9… but for completely different reasons".