With cooking shows have become all the rage, it seems like everyone is getting into the act - even your friendly neighborhood amateur chefs.

So, YouTube co-founder Steve Chen wants to bring your food obsession to a computer screen near you. Last week he and his new San Franciso startup launched Nom - offer live interactive video for amateurs to share their cooking and possibly become the next food celebrity.

Chen sat down with former YouTube engineering lead Vijay Karunamurthy to talk about the new platform at the South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive conference in Austin, Texas.

Choose Your Own Food Adventure

The two discussed how technology and the Internet have made food porn such a cultural phenomenon around the world.

"Almost every time we get together with family or friends, the conversation ends up being about food," Chen said. "It's just exciting to be able to see what someone around the world is eating in Sicily or Tokyo."

But what Nom offers beyond the popular cooking shows of recent years is a chance for viewers to engage with the hosts. Not knowing how a video will finish - much less how a dish will turn out - adds an element of excitement that Chen hopes will attract a new type of audience.

"It's kind of this choose-your-own-adventure you're playing along with the host," Chen said. "You're actually changing the outcome of what this video is." Viewers can give feedback with emojis, even participating in polls, and, of course, comments.

Big Data Suggests Food Porn Addiction is Real

If there's any question whether this #foodporn phenomenon is a real thing.

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analysts from the Qatar Computing found that the #foodporn keyword appeared almost 10 million times on Instagram between November 2014 and April 2015:

Some wondered whether or not such addiction with food is leading to unhealthy eating habits. The researchers point out that at least the rate of approval or “likes” was indeed higher for healthy foods than unhealthy ones. “The heightened social approval of healthy tags suggests that the community is already self-policing in promoting a healthier lifestyle,” they said.

Of course, it's hard to say whether this bias really comes from our growing image-consciousness in social media and a need to appear to prefer healthy choices.