Gwen Ifill died on Monday, November 14 at the age of 61, according to PBS. Ifill has been described as a prominent African-American journalist who was well-known and popular in the media. She died after several months of cancer treatment. The journalist battled endometrial Cancer while covering this year's presidential election. She was surrounded by family and friends when she died. Gwen was a great journalist who was admired by colleagues at PBS. Employees at PBS expressed their sincere condolences to Gwen’s friends and family.

Gwen Ifill

Gwen Ifill was a veteran journalist and newscaster. She was the moderator and managing editor of "Washington Week" and the "PBS NewsHour." "Washington Week" is a political discussion show. "PBS NewsHour" is an hour-long evening newscast that Ifill managed and co-anchored with Judy Woodruff. Ifill knew her politics. She was the first African-American woman to host a major political talk show.

In 2009, the journalist wrote a best-selling book about President Obama called "The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama."

In his statement, Paul Kerger, CEO of PBS, said Gwen was a "trusted window on the world by audiences across the nation." What he meant was that the New York native had proven to be responsible, accountable, and trustworthy when it came to good journalism. Those who have spoken about Ifill's work said she broke gender and racial barriers and became a role model for other journalists across the country. President Obama made a statement about her death and spoke very highly of her during his News conference on Monday.

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Ifill and PBS

The African-American journalist joined PBS in 1999. During her career, she covered seven presidential campaigns and moderated two vice presidential debates. One debate she moderated was between Dick Cheney and John Edwards in 2004. The other debate was between Joe Biden and Sarah Palin in 2008. Because of Gwen's work with PBS and other organizations, she will be remembered for her contributions to thoughtful and genuine journalism and her ability to report the news in a fair way.

She received more than 20 honorary doctorates for her work as a journalist. She will be remembered as one who could be trusted with the news.

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