The 2016 election cycle has become one of the most controversial in recent history. With the candidacy for Donald Trump, all bets are off as the direction of American politics appears to be changed forever.

Trump's low blow

Throughout the course for the Republican primary, Trump made a habit of getting personal with his conservative opponents. Trump's initial hit on former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush as "low energy" instantly sunk his chances at getting another Bush to the White House.

The billionaire real estate mogul went on to attack the rest of the Republican field, going an extra mile to target his perceived biggest threat, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. With less than 50 days until Election Day and only 48 hours until the first presidential debate, Trump is threatening to make Hillary Clinton and her family uncomfortable in front of a record audience, as reported by The Hill on September 24.

After Clinton invited billionaire owner of the NBA's Dallas Mavericks, Mark Cuban, to watch the debate in the front row at Hofstra University on Long Island, New York, Trump decided to fire back. Cuban is a staunch critic of Trump, and the former host of "The Apprentice" responded on his offical Twitter account Saturday morning.

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"If dopey Mark Cuban of failed Benefactor fame wants to sit in the front row, perhaps I will put Gennifer Flowers right alongside of him!," Trump tweeted.

Gennifer Flowers had an affair with Bill Clinton, which the former president admitted to under oath in 1998. Bill Clinton has long been accused of a series of extramarital affairs, as well as sexual assault allegations over the years.

Moving forward

According to the latest rolling average from Real Clear Politics, Trump is trailing Clinton on a national level, but by less than three points. Trump has pulled ahead in Florida and Ohio, but Clinton continues to hold the lead in various other battleground states, like Colorado, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Wisconsin. The former Secretary of State also has a historic advantage with minority voters which leaves her the favorite to walk out a winner in November.

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