Former Vice President Al Gore won’t be endorsing Hillary Clinton. Or speaking at the Democratic National Convention (DNC). Could it be his long, complex history with the former first lady? Or that he secretly favored climate change champion Bernie Sanders? Maybe it’s the treasure trove of emails posted over the weekend on WikiLeaks showing how the DNC colluded with the Clinton campaign and Democratic-leaning news organizations to deprive Sanders the nomination. Either way, Gore’s self-provoked expatriation from the Democratic Party is just one more indication of an convention in chaos. Some have speculated Gore is too busy focusing on climate change, and can't take the time for a video address à la Marco Rubio at the RNC.

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Gore won’t endorse Hillary.

Unlike past elections, this time Gore has refused to formally endorse the presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, and is one of the most conspicuous holdouts not joining the Clinton coronation. But if anyone knows Hillary at her best (and worst), it’s Al Gore, who spent eight years in the White House working with her and President Bill Clinton.

Sources also say he has a “complicated” relationship with the nominee. Gore has also maintained an eerie silence since Clinton officially became the nominee, something rare for a party that demands unity above all else. But people familiar with Gore know he thinks climate change comes first and everything else is secondary.

In May, CNN made a ruckus when Mitt Romney and a few prominent Republican establishment figures decided not to attend the Republican convention. Alex Burns of the NY Times even tweeted:

Sanders supporters furious.

The official reason for Gore skipping the DNC is that he wants to keep the focus on climate change.

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But Sanders’ supporters are already on the streets in Philly protesting inaction on climate change, fueled in large part by the leaked DNC emails. In them they show how the DNC worked tirelessly to deprive Sanders the election, to make Hillary the nominee, and to coordinate with media outlets on pre-approved questions and talking points. But if Al Gore chose to speak at the convention, he would have the loudest mic in the world, and the focus would again turn to his favorite topic.

Gore told Politico magazine in a 2014 interview that it was “premature” to back Hillary for president, acknowledging that her "heart was in the right place" and that she’d be a "positive agent for change." Hillary in the past has been in favor of fracking and coal-fired power but has since swung 180 degrees to appease the progressive left.

History redux?

Gore has only passed on a Democratic convention once before. He blew off President Obama’s reelection party in 2012. During that convention, Gore was anchoring the event on the now-defunct cable station Current TV, though he did officially endorse Obama. Gore has since sold the network to Al-Jazeera, owned by an oil conglomerate from the Middle East. After leaving office, Gore was a featured speaker at the 2004 and 2008 DNCs. He has also been a major force in Obama's second-term focus on building a climate change legacy.

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Gore’s spokesperson has also told news organizations that he won’t have any comments until after the convention.