Astronomers at the #University Of Edinburgh discover strange #Magnetic Fields in the universe. They use the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to find out the exact origin of the magnetic fields. Researchers believe that the galaxies emit a dark matter to form the magnetic fields. The dark matter combines with hot gasses and charged particles. The fields are present over the distance of one million light years. Experts claim that these are the most extended waves in the universe. The results of the project will be published on April 22 in the journal “Astronomy & Astrophysics.”

The origin of giant waves

Max Harry at the University of Edinburgh says galaxy clusters could be the largest origin of the radioactive waves.

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With a typical extent of 10 million light years, galaxies host a large number of stellar systems. These are home to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and charged particles. All the materials embed in the large holes of the dark matter to compose magnetic fields. But Harry has not confirmed anything and requires more time to provide evidence of the origin of the major magnetic fields. The collision of galaxy clusters produces hot gasses in a significant number. These gasses continuously shape the structure of the universe and form magnetic fields.

Emission of gasses

Harry and his team use the 100-m radio telescope to observe the radioactive fields. He says the galaxy clusters emit strange radioactive waves that have a wavelength of 6 cm. Previously, NASA found some radioactive waves in our #Milky Way.

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And now scientists observe them throughout the universe. Harry believes that galaxy clusters in the universe create exceptionally high radioactive waves, but their exact origin is unknown. Our Milky Way and other galaxies release gasses in a large number. Scientists will soon determine the distance between the gas clouds and the local radioactive waves. Magnetic fields cause rotation of the polarization plane and are larger than the galaxy clusters. Harry plans to use the Effelsberg radio telescope to detect all waves in the universe. He will systematically search for ordered waves in the galaxy clusters. Magnetometers could also be used to resolve some enduring mysteries in this study.