#corruption has long plagued the world and while unfortunate, its most common form can be seen behind offices regular citizens aren’t allowed to enter, behind a podium or on TV. Attempts to expose these people’s dirty laundry also come in various forms, but an anti-corruption program in Brazil seems to have found the ultimate method to do so, by way of a #Chrome plug-in.

Purple, the color of corruption

Aptly named Colour of Corruption, this plug-in, launched two weeks ago by Reclame Aqui, shows users of the current charges and investigations politicians in #Brazil are facing. Its arrival comes just in time for Brazil’s general election next year to choose its new President and Vice President, the National Congress, state Governors, Vice Governors and state Legislative Assemblies.

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Users of the plug-in need not do anything but hover the mouse over a name, which will then automatically show details concerning the politician, all highlighted in purple. It works anywhere on the web, including social media sites.

The plug-in gets its data from Brazil’s legal court systems so information on illegal activities, politicians who have been convicted and are currently being investigated is credible. According to its website, the program “transforms any Brazilian internet user’s navigator into a revelation tool” set to become the main source of information to be used by voters for the upcoming 2018 and 2020 elections.

As of this writing, the plug-in has had over 13,000 downloads so far. While the sole purpose is to inform voters, Iago Bolivar, the program’s director of operations, said that Colour of Corruption is a way to overcome opposing “truths,” especially in a time where fake news is an at all-time high.

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Program expansion

Colour of Corruption technically is in its infancy stage, but Bolivar says the team is open to expanding. Game-changers from Hungary and Mexico have requested local versions of the plug-in, but the director noted that reliable partners are needed to make it possible.

“We believe it may be important to U.S. elections,” Bolivar was cited as saying by the International Business Times. It is seen as a sign of a social and technological fightback against deep-rooted corruption and impunity, particularly when public resentment towards the government has been inflamed by controversial plans for pension reform.

There’s no indication if the plug-in will be launched in the U.S. soon, but Bolivar and his team are optimistic about the program’s future. The plug-in is available at colourofcorruption.com.