A #Ransomware is like a malware that steals and keeps your files as hostage until you pay a fee to the source. Recently, a ransomware named "#Rensenware" has been found that is quite unique among the rest because it asks users to score 200 million points (0.2 billion points) in a game to get the files back. It does not ask for money but the difficulty of the game is on "LUNATIC" level, which implies the hardest difficulty among all.

The difficulty is enough to make a person pull their hair out because it is described as "boring a hole in a boulder using a plastic spoon." The ransomware is in the high-level quality of malware because it is hard to decrypt.

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Although, some data-miners and tech experts fixed the problem. The source also sent a code to "FORCE" the score to its quota and apologized later on.

Touhou Project anime being featured is quite a weird combination

Now, the source of the "Rensenware" apologized for his mistake and released a solution to bypass the nearly impossible task. In addition, this was developed by a Korea-based undergraduate student as a joke but then it spread like a real epidemic. The post from MalwareHunterTeam from Twitter can be viewed below with the photo of the required points from the ransomware:

Touhou Project anime is being featured and this is quite a weird combination with the ransomware, considering it is dangerous to people's computer with essential files for work or memories.

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Attempting to finish the game and gain the required high-score is impossible, but for others saying this is easy do not know the risk behind it all.

Based on the video, the person sure did some mastering before reaching to that level of expertise. But then again, it is not just worth it to master such a game for a long time in exchange of the files that were ransomed for just a certain score.

Fast bullets and nearly impossible bullets from the enemies seem to really take time to master. This has been the source of rage among tech experts and decoders because of the consequence at the end of the note. It says, "Do not try cheating or terminate this application if you don't want to blow up the encryption key." For PC owners who do not know much about tech, this would be scary. Thus, they play the game hoping to reach the score. Good thing everything's back to normal but if this problem wasn't resolved much sooner, this "ransomware" would keep spreading just like the viruses recorded in history, which destroyed numerous computers and important files.