Galaxy Note 7 has not only been banned from airplane flights, bringing it on board is now a federal crime punishable by law with penalties up to $179,993 or $180k. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued the new “Emergency Restriction / Prohibition Order” which is scheduled to be published on October 19, Wednesday, in the Federal Register and will be effective immediately.

FAA emergency order, significant clauses

Following the ban on all American flights, the FAA has issued a new emergency order (FAA-2016-9288) that will hold any person in contempt who brings Samsung's Note 7 #Smartphone onto an airplane. Issued on Friday, the new prohibitory regulations are due to be published today in the Federal Register.

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The document clearly states no passenger can carry the device "on their person, in carry-on baggage, in checked baggage, or as cargo.”

The aviation authority also added a clause that people who happen to bring the Samsung smartphone unaware of the new order or as an indeliberate act must shut down the smartphone immediately. Additionally, the FAA has also advised the carriers to restrict passengers in possession of the device from boarding airplanes.

Additional penalties

Passengers boarding airplanes with a Galaxy Note 7 device could also face up to 10-year imprisonment as a civil penalty in addition to the $180k.

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The document also encloses that such individuals are "subject to civil penalties of up to $179,933 for each violation for each day they are found to be in violation (49 U.S.C. 5123)," while prosecution could “result in fines under title 18, imprisonment of up to ten years, or both (49 U.S.C. 5124)."

Galaxy Note 7 exchange stations

Samsung is reportedly setting up Galaxy Note 7 exchange stations to prevent further loss of its reputation because any violation would certainly put Samsung in the headlines. According to #ABC #News, the tech company has set up an exchange station at San Francesco International Airport in the United States and high traffic airports in South Korea, while a similar program has also been announced for Australia and other countries where air commute is relatively high. The following video explains the FAA story in detail.