Every new administration is elected to fulfill a promise. The George W. Bush administration was elected to fulfill its promise of bringing compassionate conservatism to America. The Obama administration was elected to fulfill its promise of bringing hope and change to America.

Sometimes it goes deeper and further than campaign slogans. In 1980 Ronald Reagan ran on the slogan, “Are you Better off than you were Four Years ago?” But the real promise Reagan was elected to fulfill was the promise that America’s best days were ahead of it. The Carter years were plagued by economic recession and foreign policy blunders, like the Iran Hostage Crisis.

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It made Americans feel like the US was adrift and question whether it would ever be set on the right path again.

Into that stepped Reagan with his optimism. Reagan’s slogan during his reelection campaign in 1984, was, “It’s morning in America.” His administration was successful in fulfilling its promise of making us believe that our best days were ahead of us. How will the Trump administration go about fulfilling the promise it has been elected to fulfill?

The President’s men

Nothing sends a louder message than the people you staff your administration with. Sometimes it’s a direct message and sometimes it’s an indirect one. People read into your cabinet picks and infer from them the direction you want your administration to go and the policies you want to pursue.

The head of Breitbart News is a fellow by the name of Steve Bannon.

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Breitbart News’ views can fairly be described as right-wing. They’ve published stories with headlines like, “There’s no hiring bias against women in tech, they just suck at interviews,” and “Bill Kristol: Republican spoiler, renegade Jew.” About a week after getting elected, #Donald Trump named Steve Bannon chief strategist and senior counselor to the president, making him the highest ranking advisor in the West Wing.

Trump also announced that he’s nominating Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) to be the new Attorney General for the US. Sessions has had his own issues on the subject of civil rights. There are accusations that he’s called the NAACP “un-American” and that he once addressed a black lawyer as “boy.” He also, allegedly, once said that he was fine with the KKK until he found out its members smoked marijuana. Sessions has denied these accusations.

Trump named Lt. Gen. Mike Flynn to be the White House National Security Advisor. Flynn has worked closely with the Trump campaign since the early days.

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He has a decorated, three-decade long military career. He’s also led chants of lock her up, directed at Hillary Clinton, at Trump rallies, been very praising of Vladimir Putin, and tweeted out earlier this year that fear of Muslims is “rational.”

There are always criticisms of a president’s appointments, especially if they are from the opposite party. But it’s the type of criticisms here that are the issue. They center on race and ethnicity. And that troubles a lot of people out there.

“Hail Trump…Hail Victory”

Last month at a conference held by a prominent #alt-right group in Washington DC, a fellow by the name of Richard Spencer, gave an impassioned speech. He said, “America was until this past generation a white country...It is our creation, it is our inheritance, and it belongs to us.” And then he ended his fiery speech by saying, “Hail Trump, hail our people, hail victory!” At which point the audience stood to its feet cheering and applauding, and several people stood and gave the speaker a Nazi salute, their arms outstretched towards the stage.

A lot of Trump supporters say he’s not racist, he’s just politically incorrect. But there’s a difference between political incorrectness and white ethno-nationalism that’s disguised as political incorrectness. Is Trump really embracing of the Alt-Right movement, and if so, what does that portend for American unity and his promise to make America great again? #2016Election