Most of the media is leading their stories about the third and final debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump with the statement by Trump that he wouldn’t necessarily accept the outcome of the election if he lost. “I will look at it at the time,” he said and promised to keep moderator Chris Wallace in suspense. Most of the media is spinning the statement as the ravings of a madman. Indeed, it would be if the outcome of the election is not close, say by five or so points.

On the other hand, American history has at least one instance of a stolen presidential election, the one that took place in 1960 when the Kennedy people stuffed ballot boxes in Chicago and in Texas to take those states when they might not have had the vote count been fair.

Also, most people remember the farce in the 2000 election when then-Vice President Al Gore disputed the vote count in Florida. The recount was only stopped weeks later by the Supreme Court before it could cause a constitutional crisis. To this day, many liberals believe that the 2000 election was stolen, despite the fact that a number of media organizations concluded that George W. Bush would still have won had the recount proceeded to conclusion.

The Project Veritas videos have Democratic operatives boasting on camera of their skill at committing voter fraud. One technique has been to ship phony voters in with rented cars to conceal their identities. An investigation has been started in Indiana concerning dead voters still on the rolls.

One could conceive of a situation in which the outcome of election 2016 depends on a few hundred votes in a single state, just as happened in Florida. However, if indications of voter fraud come to light, Trump would be in his rights to dispute the outcome. In fact, for the sake of maintaining a legitimate democracy, he would be obligated to.

In short, while Trump is given to saying alarming things, refusing to accept the outcome of any election under any circumstances, even with evidence of voter fraud, is not one of them.    #2016 Presidential Debates