Black Lives Matter

It is happening to people like me, people of color, just trying to make a living. These deaths are black men and women wanting to progress. Boys and girls who aren’t even old enough to understand the generations of hatred and injustice, are exposed to the deliverance of such things frequently. We live in constant fear that nothing but our skin color and its history in America will cost us our lives. It has cost many.

Each death delivers a message, an exploding truth: this is how America sees you. We don’t chant #BlackLivesMatter because we think they matter any more than yours does. We need to scream “#Black Lives Matter” until our throats bleed because we are consistently reminded again and again and again that they do not. Terrence Crutcher is the latest person to be shot and killed by a police officer this year. Unfortunately, he has become another sobering statistic.

He did not anticipated his death at the hands of those sworn to protect him. He was forced to leave a family behind to steer the world fatherless. Many took to social media to express their outrage at the shooting, including one Twitter used named Lauren DeStefano, who pointed out how local police were able to capture Ahmad Khan Rahami — the man suspected of planting bombs in New York and New Jersey  — over the weekend without killing him. We deserve to be more than a fleetingly trending hashtag resulting from #Police Brutality. This injustice causes a unique type of rage and hopelessness that I am not yet used to. 

This particular tweets captures exactly what's wrong with policing in America. A very difficult statement to digest. Rahami was first approached by local police after being spotted. It's certainly upsetting that a suspected terrorist who was armed and shot at police is still alive, but a black man who raised his hands cannot say the same. As Lauren did, use your own platforms to elevate the importance of black lives.

Educate yourselves. March with us. Stop muting the #BlackLivesMatter statements with “all lives matter.” Enjoy our culture — but advocate for our safety.