Despite having been sued for housing discrimination against blacks and Hispanics with his father in 1975, #GOP presidential nominee #Donald Trump thinks that he will be the overwhelming candidate of choice among African-American voters four years from now when he runs for reelection as President. The politically naive real estate mogul claims that he will garnish 95% of the African-American vote in 2020.

Faulty assumptions

Trump's foolhardy claim is based upon very faulty assumptions. For one thing, he is assuming that he is going to win #Election 2016, despite being behind even in the red states, not to mention the "swing states" such as Colorado, Michigan and Pennsylvania. Secondly, he is assuming that he will like being President if elected and that he will choose to run for reelection in four years. For most presidents, the decision whether or not to run for another term is a heavily weighted one that is not made until they are well into their first term.

Finally, Trump's claim that he will attain 95% of the African-American votes in 2020 is foolhardy because he only has one percent support among African-Americans currently and he offers no economic, social or educational plan to improve the plight of African-Americans. Apparently, he believes that somehow, somewhere during his first term as President, that African-Americans will rise from plunder and economic inequity and a poor educational system, assimilate into the middle class, and reward him with a second term.

GOP's record on Civil Rights

Unfortunately for Trump, the GOP record on the issue of civil rights is very poor. In 1964, GOP Arizona Senator Barry Goldwater, who ran for President that year as his party's nominee, voted against the Civil Rights Act. Conservative, GOP publishers of the 1960's, such as William F. Buckley of the National Review, viewed the great civil rights leader Martin Luther King as a "law-breaking protester." In the 1960's, the GOP adopted the "Southern Strategy," which was a political ploy aimed at demonizing African-Americans while mobilizing white Americans against African-Americans. In 1983, GOP Senator Jesse Helms opposed the declaration of Martin Luther King's birthday as a national holiday.

With a GOP record like this, it is no wonder that winning favor among African-American voters is going to be an uphill climb for Donald Trump. Although the Republican Party led the fight against slavery during the Lincoln Administration, its record on civil rights and social justice for African-Americans has been reprehensible ever since. Although Trump may envision himself as a miracle worker, it is highly doubtful that he can erase more than 160 years of discriminatory and hateful policies towards African-Americans by GOP leaders and activists.

Belief in miracles?

Perhaps Trump really believes that he will change history and turn the wave of African-American voters in his direction. After all, he believes that he can do most everything by himself without the need for help, such as giving himself "absolution." A few days ago, Trump apologized to the American People but did not specify the acts for which he was apologizing. Then he forgave himself and acted as if the matter was over because he somehow had given himself "absolution" without the need for divine intervention.

Blame the media

Meanwhile, Trump's sagging poll numbers are the fault of the media because as he says, they misinterpret his statements. Trump's solution is to get rid of the Constitutional guarantee of "freedom of the press," which would require a Constitutional Amendment.

One busy man

It seems apparent that Trump will be one busy man for the next four years. Not only is he going to defy the polls and win in 2016, but he will overturn over 160 years of GOP racism and win favor with African-Americans. Then he will overturn "freedom of the press" and he will win 95% of the African-American vote in 2020. Does anyone know a good shrink for delusions of grandeur?