Crowdfunding platforms are a very interesting way to discover great talents and ideas around the world. Kickstarter and Indiegogo, the most active platforms for creative projects, feature the possibility to support the production of very special clothing and underwear designed for #women's breasts, serving mothers and women who have had to fight against breast cancer.

“Breastfeed in action”

Kojo is an activewear brand which supports active mothers with their breastfeeding needs. Now online with a campaign on Indiegogo until the end of March, Kojo is an idea created by Jana, a young mother who found a solution to make breastfeeding easy for both mother and baby even while practicing sports, also outdoors and in all seasons.

Advertisements
Advertisements

She designed a t-shirt model with a special cut that makes it comfortable and easy to access breasts. The materials are carefully chosen to guarantee quality, protection and comfort in full respect of skin and body.

Confidence after breast cancer treatments

Millie is a non-wired bra conceived for the comfort of women who have had to deal with breast cancer and related surgeries. Designed as the right answer to an unsatisfied need, Millie has been created by Sue, a woman who knows which kind of bra you need after an invasive breast cancer treatment. Equipped with lace details, a unique pocked design and soft cups, this bra helps women to reconnect with their most feminine part. The fundraiser for Millie will be active on Kickstarter until April 2.

High-tech armor for contact sports

Révèle, aka The Revelia, is presented as a revolutionary high tech female armor for women who practice #Contact Sports.

Advertisements

If you are a girl who loves rugby, boxing, baseball or any other sport which exposes you to potential bust pain, this project may be something you were actually looking for. This protective second skin with a powerful seamless encapsulated shock absorption technology has been developed with the support of the University of Portsmouth (UK) and a group of people including Joanna Scurr, Professor in Biomechanics and Head of the Research Group in Health Breast.