The modern world is wonderful, especially if you're one of the growing numbers of "cord cutters:" people who have abandoned traditional Cable TV in favor of relying on alternatives made available by high-speed Internet connections.

Using solutions cobbled together by whatever Frankenstein-ian, demi-homebrewed combination of technologies, devices, and streaming media outlets that best suit their needs, cord cutters have rejoiced over the last several years, as more and more mainstream media powerhouses have responded to their desires.

For me it was watching the Superbowl live via my Roku. This year, it's watching tonight's #Presidential Debates as covered by NBC and streamed via Youtube.

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If NBC isn't your cup of tea, a simple Google search will reveal numerous different alternatives to their coverage, all streamed live, over the Internet, with whatever commentary (or lack thereof) that you choose. So get down with your inner-uber geek and watch the content you want to see, live, free, and with whatever flavor of analysis you choose.

Real Political Change.

This is change that ordinary people - who are tired of being bullied by the cable TV and news media monopolies - can really feel and appreciate. This is especially noticeable in the politically divisive context of rough-and-tumble American politics, where the media spin of the candidate's handlers seems to combine with the frequently toxic quotidian out-of-context "analysis" provided by the talking heads of news presenters, serving up a nasty stew of unwatchable, divisive, partisan insanity.

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Analysis You Actually Want

Partisan insanity, admittedly, makes for excellent Reality TV, but (apart from Trump's decade of experience working in that medium), this isn't supposed to be entertainment: it's supposed to be political bloodsport. To that end, there's nothing that can surpass the freedom of choice offered by the numerous flavors of streaming media that are carrying the debate; if you personally hate a certain network's slanted coverage, or find a certain commentator to be a vapid, vacuous nonentity, you no longer have to put up with it: don't change the channel, change the medium.

I know; it's the future, and it's scary, but it's time to get with the program, brought to you via the Interwebs.