Beginning of this year, the outbreak of Ebola in Africa was presented as a threat to mankind. The same happened in the early ‘80s with Aids. Neither of these however is the most deadly disease in the world. The chance of dying from Ebola or Aids is much smaller than dying from a heart attack. The latest statistics from the World #Health Organization (2012) of the most deadly diseases may come as a surprise to you.

1. Coronary Artery Disease (13.2%)

As much as 7.4 million people died of Coronary Artery Disease. Narrowed blood vessels can block the blood supply and result in a heart attack. Americans, Europeans and Australians are more at risk because of their live style and diet.

2. Stroke (11.9%)

When the blood flow to the brain is blocked, death follows in minutes. 6.7 million people per year die of a stroke. With prompt medical assistance, you can survive a stroke but often parts of the body stay paralyzed afterwards. Risk factors are the same as for CAD.

3. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (9%)

Lung diseases like Chronic Bronchitis and emphysema are responsible for 3.1 million deaths per year. Tobacco and air pollution are the main causes.

4. Lower Respiratory Infections (5.5 %)

3.1 million people died from something as simple as influenza, bronchitis or pneumonia. The risk area is not limited to the western world and it is very contagious because the bacteria are air-born.

5. Bronchus and Lung cancers (2.9%)

Good for 1.6 million deaths, caused by smoking and environment toxins.

6. HIV/Aids (2.7%)

1.5 million people died in 2013, mostly in Africa and Asia. Although it is a deadly infection, it is not nearly as contagious as influenza.

7. Diarrhea (2.7%)

An intestinal infection through viruses, bacteria or parasites can cause diarrhea, which resulted in 1.5 million victims in 2012. Mostly the population of Africa and Asia is infected due to lack of hygiene.

8. Diabetes:

As a result of the western diet, millions develop diabetes. This disease increases the risks of heart failure and even kidney failure. In 2012, 1.5 million people died as a result of diabetes.

9. Premature Birth complications:

1.1 million babies died because of birth complications.

10. Tuberculosis:

This bacterial infection has existed since the beginning of mankind and still hasn’t been eradicated. Mostly development countries report about 900,000 deaths per year.

Malaria: Although 3.2 billion people are at risk of getting malaria, only 584,000 actually died in 2013. 

Ebola: Being a very dangerous and contagious virus, this disease absolutely needs to be treated to prevent a pandemonium. But in 2015, the number of deaths reported worldwide was only 11,302, far from the most deadly disease.

Six of the most deadly diseases can be avoided by living healthy #News